Save Twitter Time with Paper.li Daily News

Lori Halley 09 September 2010 8 comments

paper_li_rjleaman_nonprofit-technology If you don’t have the time (or patience) to wade through a constant stream of Twitter updates, looking for items of use and interest among the chit-chat, here’s an efficient and easy-on-the-eyes way to get on-topic tweets.

Paper.li gets your “listening” organized with newspaper-style web pages of Twitter updates, or browse the online “papers” created by others: 

A great way to stay on top of all that is shared by the people you follow - even if you are not connected 24/7 !

To find an existing paper on a topic related to your cause or personal interests, you can explore the links on the Paper.li home page, or try the search box there.

If there’s no paper to match your search query, you can quickly create the paper you want:

  1. Sign in via your Twitter or Facebook account.
     

  2. Create a “paper” based on:

    • Username
    • The newspaper will be created using all the links (articles)
      shared in the past 24 hours by the selected Twitter account (curator)
      AND the people being followed by that user (contributors) – see the Maddie Grant Daily, for example.

    • Hashtag
    • The newspaper will be created using all the links (articles)
      shared in the past 24 hours by all Twitter users that have
      associated the selected #tag
       – e.g. #nptech or #assnchat

    • Twitter list
    • The newspaper will be created using all the links (articles)
      shared in the past 24 hours by all Twitter users on the selected list
      – the screenshot image here shows a Paper.li page based on my nonprofit-technology list, for example. (Note that this only applies to lists you set up via twitter.com, not groups and lists created in a third-party client such as tweetdeck.)

  3. Wait a short time for the tweets to be gathered...

How much time it’ll take to publish any particular “paper” seems to depend on the number of tweets that have to be sorted through, understandably, but I’ve never seen it take longer than overnight to pull a page together. 

Once your paper’s in place, it’s updated automatically every 24 hours. 

You can bookmark your new publication to find it again, or just check “my paper.li” dashboard (where you can also choose to delete those papers you no longer want or need). Papers are public, so you can share a  link (Twitter and Facebook buttons included) to help others in your network stay up to date on the Twitter news, too!

No, it's not comprehensive. Yes, you'll miss some real gems you might (possibly) catch if you were monitoring tweets for every waking moment of your day – but who has that kind of time to spend on Twitter?  Judicious use of Paper.li means you can at least catch the highlights in about the time it'll take you to grab a cup of coffee.

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Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot]

Posted by Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot]

Published Thursday, 09 September 2010 at 7:41 PM

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Comments

  • Marco said:

    Thursday, 09 September 2010 at 6:44 PM

    Great overview!

    Now, if we could just stop everyone from auto-tweeting about their new paper.li... ;-)

  • Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot]

    Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] said:

    Thursday, 09 September 2010 at 7:21 PM

    Yes indeed, Marco. It should be noted that the "tweet this" option is, well, optional. A little self-promotion is not at all a bad thing, but tweets automatically generated by the application you're trying out are not always the best way to go!

  • Laura Schenone said:

    Friday, 10 September 2010 at 7:11 AM

    Thanks so much for this.  It's hard to see how much different this is from hootesuite or twitterdeck.  Can you comment as to why this is better?

    thanks!

    Laura

  • Laura Schenone said:

    Friday, 10 September 2010 at 7:13 AM

    This is great.  Thanks so much.  Do you care to comment on how or if this is better than using hootesuite or twitterdeck to organize tweets?  

    many thanks!

    Laura

  • Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot]

    Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] said:

    Friday, 10 September 2010 at 7:25 AM

    Hi Laura,

    Everyone has their own preferred tools, of course, but I can tell you a few things I like about Paper.li when I just want to check in quickly and get a sense of what's been happening on Twitter, with regard to specific topics (or conversation groups) that interest me:

    One, obviously, is the format, which I find much easier on the eyes and easier to absorb than a constantly refreshing stream of tweets.

    Two - although Twylah, which we talked about a short time ago, does this too - I like being able to see a short preview of each story without needing to click through on each link to see if it's going to be as interesting as the title or tweet made it sound.

    Three, I like the way it brings in tweets from "contributors" when organizing the news. I used the example of Maddie Grant's "daily" in this post: Maddie and I follow many of the same people, naturally, but the match is far from perfect. Paper.li takes into account the stories shared by people Maddie follows when compiling her page - some of whose tweets I might not otherwise discover.

    I don't see Paper.li as necessarily "better" than some of the clients like Hootsuite or Tweetdeck for actively managing your conversations on Twitter - but for "catching up on the news" - yes, I do find that Paper.li is both more enjoyable and efficient.

    Plus, you don't get distracted into Twitter chatting! :)

  • laura Schenone said:

    Saturday, 11 September 2010 at 5:52 AM

    Rebecca, Thanks for your reply.  Helpful!

    (And sorry I posted my comment twice--thought the first one was lost.)

  • Laura Schenone said:

    Saturday, 11 September 2010 at 5:53 AM

    Thanks Rebecca.  I'll try it.

  • Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot]

    Lori Halley [Engaging Apricot] said:

    Saturday, 11 September 2010 at 6:05 AM

    It just takes a minute or few for a new comment to appear, Laura - no problem. Glad to help!

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